Loading...
2018 Edition 205 Fall IN THIS ISSUE 1st Saturday Market 2 Art and Health Dialogues 3 Random Act of Kindness Nominations 3 WomenVenture Partnership 4 I Love BC 5 Earle Brown Days Recap 6 Community Safety 8 Explorer Program 8 Neighborhood Area Meeting 8 Back to School Safety 9 Living Green 10 Recycling Unwanted Clothing 10 Focus on Pets 11 Preventing Sewer Backups 11 NEWSCi t y City of Brooklyn Center Celebrating the news, events & cultures that connect us AUGUST 2018, Edition 205 FROM THE CITY MANAGER CITY OF BROOKLYN CENTER HIRES 16 BROOKLYNK SUMMER INTERNS Pictured above: Six of 16 Brooklynk 2018 Summer Interns ELECTIONS 2018 (Things You Should Know) Primary Elections will be held on Tuesday, August 14. Polls are open from 7 am to 8 pm. For polling locations or additional information, please refer to the City’s website at www. cityofbrooklyncenter.org. Also, feel free to contact the City Clerk at (763) 569-3306 or email cityclerk@ ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us. GETTING BROOKLYN CENTER YOUTH IN THE JOB PIPELINE! For the second year in a row, the City along with city, school and business partners has taken on more than 100 BrookLynk Interns this summer. The City has hired 16 youth to work in various departments throughout the City. What are interns learning so far? • According to an intern in the Community Development Department, understanding community health issues and neighborhood implications related to hoarding has been a valuable lesson learned. “There are approximately 8 to 11 cases of hoarding in the City per year,” said the intern during a verbal presentation of lessons learned. • The engineering intern in the Department of Public Works believes understanding the value of properly documenting and retaining street and site plan maps in a digital age is invaluable. “Digitizing maps from decades ago is a big deal,” stated the intern during a verbal discussion among intern peers. • Learning about how budgets are developed and addressing the challenge of striking a balance between the needs for services and cost constraints has been a great learning experience for the Administrative Department intern. “There are many things to know that goes into a budget,” said the intern during one-on- one discussion with a department director. Almost every department at the City is currently hosting one or more of the 16 BrookLynk Interns, which exposes the interns to an array of career opportunities ranging from law enforcement to business development. The interns will complete a capstone project at the end of the program in order to demonstrate what they have learned. They will each conduct a presentation during the National Night Out Kick Off Party held on Monday, August 6, 2018 at Brooklyn Center’s Centennial Park (6:00 pm to 8:00 pm). Thank you to all of the interns. Way to go! Curt Boganey, City Manager 2 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y Community Engagement 1ST SATURDAY MARKET SPOTLIGHT The 1st Saturday Pop-Up Market is a city-sponsored event that will take place the first Saturday of each month from July through October. The event will feature local vendors selling various goods, food tents, food trucks, live entertainment, and a family fun zone. The family fun zone includes large inflatables, a balloon artist and face painting – all at no cost! Admission to the event is free and open to the public. Located at 5801 Xerxes Ave, Brooklyn Center (across the street from Cub Foods). Hours of the event are from 11:00 am to 5 pm and the event will take place rain or shine. Free parking for the event will be available on-site. Additional information regarding the event can be found at: www.popupsaturday.com. If you are interested in becoming a vendor at a future event, please contact Brett Angell, Business and Workforce Development Specialist, at (763)569-3301 or bangell@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us. For more event photos, visit the 1st Saturday Market album on our facebook page at facebook.com/BrooklynCenterMN. 3 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org BROOKLYN CENTER ENGAGES COMMUNITY THROUGH ART AND HEALTH DIALOGUES Two public dialogue sessions with different topics were held in June as part of the City of Brooklyn Center’s Inclusive Community Engagement effort. The first dialogue session was held at The Sanctuary at Brooklyn Center on Wednesday, June 27. The second dialogue session was held at the West Fire Station in Brooklyn Center on Thursday, June 28. Attendees participating in the discussions brainstormed ideas on either Community Art or Community Health. It was important to know from their perspective what's important to them when it comes to improving their health and or engaging in the arts. Another focus was how to engage individuals who live, work or play in the Brooklyn Center community. These dialogue sessions were held in partnership with the Brooklyn Center Community School District. These were the first of many conversations. Pictured top right: (left to right) Miamon Queeglay, Community Liaison (Brooklyn Center Police), Mykella Auld, Community Schools Site Coordinator (Earle Brown Elementary School, Brooklyn Center Early College Academy), Dr. Angel R. Smith, Communications Coordinator (Brooklyn Center), Ginny McIntosh, City Planner/ Zoning Administrator (Brooklyn Center) and Dr. Reggie Edwards, Deputy City Manager (Brooklyn Center) Pictured bottom Health Dialogue attendees discuss vision for a collaborative community program CITY COUNCIL MEETS WITH CONGRESSMAN ELLISON Brooklyn Center Councilmembers and City staff met with Congressman Keith Ellison on March 26, at City Hall, for an annual meeting to discuss the City's Strategic and Legislative priorities and Federal updates. Pictured above (left to right) Councilmember Dan Ryan, Mayor Tim Willson, Councilmember April Graves, Congressman Keith Ellison, Councilmember Kris Lawrence-Anderson and Councilmember Marquita Butler. RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS NOMINATIONS Do you know someone whose compassionate deed has made Brooklyn Center a great place to live and work? The City Council wants to hear these stories. To nominate someone who has performed an act of kindness in the past year, you may send a card, letter, drawings or photographs of people performing kind acts, or use the City's nomination form which can be found on the City’s website search Random Acts of Kindness. Please submit your Random Acts of Kindness nominations by Thursday, September 20, 2018. The City Council will recognize Random Acts of Kindness nominees at an October meeting and present each recipient with a certificate acknowledging their kind act. 4 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y City News 2040 Comprehensive Plan. The City of Brooklyn Center is in the process of updating its 2040 Comprehensive Plan. This is an extensive process that requires input and investment from the community. Why Update the City’s Comprehensive Plan now? The Metropolitan Land Planning Act requires all cities and counties in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area to adopt a Comprehensive Plan, and to update and amend those plans every ten years. The Plan is required to comply with the Metropolitan Council’s regional system plans that include transportation (highways and transit), wastewater services, airports, parks and open space. The Plan update must be submitted to the Metropolitan Council for review and approval, and then be adopted by the City. What is a Comprehensive Plan? A Comprehensive Plan establishes a community’s long-term vision, goals, strategies and policies for guiding future changes and investments. The Plan is intended to serve as a roadmap for the City for the next 20-year planning period. The Brooklyn Center Plan Update will address future land uses, housing, economic development, transportation, parks, trails, open space, natural resources and city services/facilities. The process involves the following steps: • Review of Brooklyn Center’s current 2030 Comprehensive Plan to determine updates • Background Report preparation, issue identification, visioning and goal setting • Identification of specific issues and plan components • Comprehensive updates of the Plan • Review of the plan by surrounding jurisdictions • Submittal to the Metropolitan Council for review and approval • Public Hearing by the City’s Planning Commission • Final Adoption by the City Council Planning Commission is the primary working group that is in charge of updating the plan, with public engagement and public input opportunities to help shape the draft Plan. The City has created a website where residents can find out more information about the 2040 Comprehensive Plan process. www.brooklyncenterplan2040.com The City will be soliciting input from residents in the form of three different online surveys that will examine different elements of the Plan: 1) Image, Land Use, Redevelopment & Housing; 2) Mississippi River Critical Corridor Area; and ) Transit, Transportation, Parks & Trails and Infrastructure. Check the website for more details and to take the surveys. SPOTLIGHT The City of Brooklyn Center and WomenVenture have recently partnered together to provide free business and lending consultations monthly at Brooklyn Center City Hall (6301 Shingle Creek Parkway). Consultations typically last between 20-30 minutes. There is no appointment necessary and no cost to participate. WomenVenture will be providing the consultations at Brooklyn Center City Hall the third Monday of each month from 9:30 to 11:30 am. WomenVenture is a Minneapolis-based organization focused on empowering entrepreneurial women with tools, capital, and support needed to lead businesses and achieve economic success through small business ownership. Additional information regarding WomenVenture can be found on their website: www.womenventure.org. 5 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org “I LOVE BC” BRANDING MERCHANDISE AVAILABLE AT CITY HALL Show your BC pride with one of these limited-edition “I Love BC” items. Both Mugs /T-Shirts are available for purchase now at City Hall. Mugs / T-Shirts (YS, YL, Adult S-XL): $10 each BROOKLYN CENTER KICKS OFF "I LOVE BC" CAMPAIGN As part of the rebranding effort, the City of Brooklyn Center launched an “I Love BC” Campaign in June during the Earle Brown Days community celebration week. Both event attendees, City interns and employees were able to show their BC pride. For more event photos, visit the I Love BC album on our facebook page at facebook.com/BrooklynCenterMN. 6 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y The 36th Annual Earle Brown Days Community Celebration was held Thursday, June 21 - Saturday, June 23. The event featured a variety of activities including a parade, golf festival, beer and wine tasting event, 5k race and family festival. We ordered great weather and it was delivered. Community members cheered on 62 units as the parade marched through Brooklyn Center including high school bands, Zuhrah Shrine band and antique cars, drumlines, local business and community groups, public safety and politicians. The 2018 Grand Marshal was Arvid “Bud” Sorenson, a 46 year Brooklyn Center resident who has been an active volunteer with the Jaycees, Lions Club and Parks & Recreation Commission. Thank you to the Brooklyn Center Lions Club for volunteering with the parade. The Red, White and Brew event had a great turnout! Attendees raved about the great location and fun times had including an engaging dueling pianos group, great food and the variety beer and wine samples. Tom Agnes, Brooklyn Center Liquors Manager stated, “I think our 1st year of doing this went very well. Let’s keep it rolling and grow into a bigger, greater event every year”. Days 20 1 8 7 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org After the Kids 1k Fun Run, neighbors, friends and families raced around Palmer Lake Park at the Run, Jump or Fly 5k. Racers and their fans enjoyed refreshments, massages, lawn games and dancing after crossing the finish line. This superhero themed race benefited Special Olympics Minnesota and Earle Brown Days. Thank you to Brooklyn Center businesses for their support of this event: Showdown Displays, Dettling Chiropractic, Walmart, Caribou Coffee and Cub Foods. The 36th Annual Earle Brown Days Community Celebration concluded with the family festival at Centennial Park. Event attendees strolled through the community market, explored City vehicles, played games, enjoyed tasty food and danced the night away with Belladiva Show Band before ooh-ing and aaah- ing at the grand finale, fireworks! Every department at the City of Brooklyn Center works together to create the annual community celebration and wishes to extend appreciation to the vendors at each event, we hope you return again next year. The City would also like to thank the sponsors of the 36th Annual Earle Brown Days Community Celebration: Minneapolis Northwest Tourism, Luther Auto, Showdown Displays, Brooklyn Center Business Association, Dettling Chiropractic, Women’s Club of Brooklyn Center, Curves of Brooklyn Center, and Brooklyn Center Rotary. Thank you to each of the residents of Brooklyn Center that attended the celebration, you are what makes these events a success. We hope you had a great time and welcome you to celebrate Brooklyn Center with us again next year! COMMUNITY CELEBRATION A SUCCESS 8 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y Community Safety 2018 POLICE DEPARTMENT NEIGHBORHOOD AREA MEETING September 11 | West Palmer Lake Park | 6:00-7:30 pm For more information contact 763-503-3272    EXPLORER PROGRAM The Brooklyn Center Police Explorers Post #3888 are currently accepting applications for youth who wish to become a Police Explorer. Police Explorers are comprised of youth ages 14 years old to 21 years old with an interest in law enforcement. Police Explorers take part in many community events within the City of Brooklyn Center and surrounding cities. Other activities include weekly trainings, parades, security events, ride along with police officers, and many more. They are supplied with a uniform, all necessary equipment, food and beverage, and much more. It is a great way for youth to meet new friends and experience what it is like to be involved in a career in law enforcement. Anyone who is interested is encouraged to contact Officer Gregg Nordby via email gnordby@ci.brooklyn-center. mn.us or phone at 763-503-3224 for information. Applications can also be picked up at the Brooklyn Center Police Department.    DOMESTIC ABUSE RESPONSE TEAM The Brooklyn Center Police Department Domestic Abuse Response Team (DART) was formed in response to the growing need to address domestic violence. The team provides support and resources to members of the community affected by domestic violence. Members of DART provide follow-up and resources to nearly every victim of domestic violence, as well as other family members and sometimes offenders. DART officers work with victims and their families to provide safety planning, offer referrals to resources, provide support. Members may also become involved in the apprehension of wanted offenders and may follow-up with to ensure that court ordered no contact conditions are not being violated. THE GROWING NEED FOR NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH Neighborhood Watch is one of the oldest and most effective crime prevention programs in the country, bringing citizens together with law enforcement to deter crime and make communities safer. Sponsored by the National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA), Neighborhood Watch can trace its roots back to the days of colonial settlements, when night watchmen patrolled the streets. The modern version of Neighborhood Watch was developed in response to requests from sheriffs and police chiefs who were looking for a crime prevention program that would involve residents and address an increasing number of burglaries. If your neighborhood does not have a Neighborhood Watch Group it’s easy to start. Neighborhood Watch is a neighborhood organization made up of neighbors for the purpose of eliminating crime from their neighborhoods. There is safety in numbers, the more participants we have in this program, the more criminals we can keep out of our city. The police alone cannot fight crime. We need our community members to be the “eyes and ears” to help the police by reporting any suspicious activity that you observe. You know your neighbors best and who does and doesn’t belong in your neighborhood. If you want to start a neighborhood watch group, it’s easy to do; contact Crime Prevention Specialist Becky Boie at 763.503.3272 or bboie@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us for details. There are many benefits to joining a watch groups, you will receive the updates on what’s happening in the City, crime watch signs, and have a great reason to get together with your neighbors, police and fire officials at least once a year. Neighborhood Watch Groups are sponsored by the City of Brooklyn Center and by the Brooklyn Center Crime Prevention Program. Call today to find out how to start your own group. 9 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org BACK TO SCHOOL SAFETY TIPS Riding the Bus School bus transportation is safe. In fact, buses are safer than cars! Even so, last year, approximately 26 students were killed and another 9,000 were injured in incidents involving school buses. More often than not, these deaths and injuries didn't occur in a crash, but as the pupils were entering and exiting the bus. Remember these safety tips: • Have a safe place to wait for your bus, away from traffic and the street. • Stay away from the bus until it comes to a complete stop and the driver signals you to enter. • When being dropped off, exit the bus and walk ten giant steps away from the bus. Keep a safe distance between you and the bus. Also, remember that the bus driver can see you best when you are back away from the bus. • Use the handrail to enter and exit the bus. • Stay away from the bus until the driver gives his/her signal that it's okay to approach. • Be aware of the street traffic around you. Drivers are required to follow certain rules of the road concerning school buses, however, not all do. Protect yourself and watch out! Walking and Biking to School Even if you don't ride in a motor vehicle, you still have to protect yourself. Because of minimal supervision, young pedestrians face a wide variety of decisions while walking to and from school. Here are a few basic safety tips to follow: • Mind all traffic signals and/or the crossing guard -- never cross the street against a light, even if you don't see any traffic coming. • Walk your bike through intersections. • Walk with a buddy. • Wear reflective material...it makes you more visible to street traffic. Riding in a Car You might have heard before that most traffic crashes occur close to home ... they do. Safety belts are the best form of protection passengers have in the event of a crash. They can lower your risk of injury by 45%. You are four times more likely to be seriously injured or killed if ejected from the vehicle in a crash. Everyone needs to be buckled up properly. That means older kids in seat belts, younger kids in booster seats and little kids in child safety seats. Information provided by the Minnesota Crime Prevention Association HEATSTROKE PREVENTION The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Safe Kids Worldwide is asking the public to act to help save lives. Heatstroke is the leading cause of non-crash related vehicle fatalities for kids 14 and younger in the United States. In the first six months of 2017, 26 children nationwide died of heatstroke after being left in a car. NHTSA cautions that temperatures inside a vehicle can reach deadly levels in just 10 minutes, which is why you should never leave a child alone in a parked car; keep the keys out of a child’s reach and look in the front and back of the vehicle before locking the door and walking away. The agency’s public education campaign “Where’s Baby? Look Before You Lock” offers these tips. For Parents and Caregivers: Remind yourself that the child is in the car. • Place a briefcase, purse, or cell phone next to the child’s car seat so that you’ll always check the back seat before leaving the car. • Call your spouse or another caregiver to confirm you’ve dropped your child off. • Have your daycare provider call you if your child doesn’t arrive. • Write a note and place it on the dashboard of your car, or set a reminder on your cell phone. For Bystanders: Actions to take if you see a child alone in a vehicle: • Always make sure the child is okay and responsive. If not, call 911 immediately. • If the child appears to be okay, attempt to locate the parents or have security or management page the car owner over the PA system. • If the child is not responsive and appears to be in distress, attempt to get into the car to assist the child, even if that means breaking a window. Stay connected with NHTSA: Visit us on Facebook. com/NHTSA | Follow us on Twitter.com/NHTSAgov | Contact us at NHTSAmedia@dot.gov or 202-366- 9550. 10 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y Living Green ORGANICS RECYCLING COLLECTION The number one item in your trash is food scraps and non-recyclable paper such as napkins, which are also called organics. Crystal is required by County ordinance to offer curbside organics recycling collection by 2022. The Hennepin Recycling Group is working on plans to roll out the service, but you don’t have to wait. Contact your garbage hauler to see if they offer the service. Or you can drop off your organics for free at the Hennepin County Drop-Off Facility, 8100 Jefferson Highway, Brooklyn Park. There’s more information on what you can put in your organics recycling at https://www.hennepin. us/dropoff and click on the “Materials accepted – recycling and organics” tab. RECYCLING UNWANTED CLOTHING Summer cleaning may leave you with a bunch of unwanted clothing. Now you can recycle those items at the curb. Fill up one of the orange recycling bags with clothes (they don’t have to be reusable), shoes, and household items. Then place the bag next to your cart on recycling day. Pick up orange bags at City Hall, the Community Center or call 1-866-835-5068 to have some mailed to you. For a list of acceptable items, visit http://simplerecycling.com/curbside-clothing-recycling/residents/. RECYCLING AT YOUR EVENT It’s the season of family reunions and other big get- togethers. Typically these events include plenty of food and beverages. So when you’re planning your party, add one more item to your list – event recycling containers. It’s pretty easy to put another container for bottles and cans next to the trash. If you don’t have extra containers, borrow some for free from Hennepin County. They even come with clear plastic bags that allow your guests to see the bottles and cans. This serves as another visual clue to put your recycling in the proper place. Reserve your containers a www. hennepin.us/business/recycling-hazardous-waste/ recycling-at-events. DID YOU KNOW Every year, each American throws out about 1,200 pounds of organic garbage that can be composted. DID YOU KNOW Nearly 100 percent of textiles and clothing are recyclable 11 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org LEAVE THE STREET CLEAN As beautiful as the leaves are, they mean a lot of yard work for homeowners. One option for reducing your workload is to use a mulching lawn mower to mulch leaves into your yard. It is less time intensive than raking and the shredded leaves act as a natural fertilizer. While tending to your yard, please take a moment to sweep or rake leaves, grass and branches out of the street in front of your house. If left in the street, leaves may clog storm drains, contributing to localized flooding. When washed into nearby lakes, rivers and streams via storm drains or ditches, the leaves become a major source of phosphorus, the nutrient that allows algae to bloom in the summer. Please dispose of leaves by composting them into your yard, bringing them to a compost facility, or bagging them for curbside pick-up if you have that service. Keep leaves and yard waste out of the regular garbage, and never dump them in the wetlands or buffer areas – it’s illegal. FRIENDLY FURRY FRIEND REMINDERS Summer is here! The weather is nice and bright and walks with our furry friends become more frequent. Let’s keep our community and furry animals safe and healthy by practicing good habits of picking up after our companion animals and keeping them on a leash when we are out and about with them. This will help ensure a more beautiful community and prevent animals and humans alike from getting into accidents. Off leash animals are more likely to be involve in a car accident, cause anxious moments for your neighbors and yourself. Although you may have built a trusting relationship with your companion animal, others may not know this and may view this as a threat when a dog is off leash. Or there may be multiple variables that affect how your dog will react to being off leash. By keeping your companion animals on a leash, will mitigate these concerns. If you happen to encounter an animal off leash, keep yourself and your dog calm, and this hopefully will invite a calm behavior from the off leash animal. If the animal seems determined to say “hello”, move your dog away. For more information regarding off leash tips, please feel free to visit the Animal Humane Society of MN website at www.animalhumanesociety.org. To friendly exercising with your furry friends everyone! PICK UP THE POOP! Dog poop is a major contributor to stormwater pollution. Rain and melting snow flows across yards, dog parks, down trails, etc. on its way to creeks via our streets and storm drains. Dog poop contains bacteria and is high in nitrogen and phosphorus. Leaving dog waste on the ground allows harmful bacteria and nutrients to wash into the storm drain and eventually into local water bodies. In Minnesota your best bet is to: Trash it. Seal the pet waste in a plastic bag and dispose of it in your trash can. Biodegradable bags are fine, but they won’t break down in a landfill so our vote is to go reused, rather than new and biodegradable. Flush it. You can flush plain dog poop down the toilet and it will be treated at a waste water facility or septic system. If you do this, never include a bag or any other extra material with the poop. Do NOT put dog or cat poop in your backyard compost pile. The temperatures in backyard compost piles do not get high enough to kill bacteria that can make humans sick. DID YOU KNOW Storm water pollution is the number 1 source of water pollution in U.S. 12 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y Public Works WHERE DOES YOUR DRINKING WATER COME FROM? Brooklyn Center relies on groundwater for providing drinking water to its residents. The City owns and operates ten wells. These wells draw water from an aquifer located several hundred feet underground. Groundwater aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from human activities on the surface. The City is working with residents to protect drinking water supplies by implementing a Wellhead Protection Plan. This plan was prepared in conjunction with several local, county and state agencies. The Minnesota Department of Health is the lead agency for the State’s program and will assist communities with defining wellhead protection areas and developing plans to protect wells. Minnesota Rural Water Association, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, provides technical assistance to public water suppliers to help meet the system’s wellhead protection goals. For more wellhead protection information, contact Minnesota Rural Water Association or the City’s Public Works Department. WHAT IS GROUNDWATER? Groundwater is the water that fills the small spaces between rock particles (sand, gravel, etc.) or cracks in solid rock. Rain, melting snow, or surface water becomes groundwater by seeping into the ground and filling these spaces. The top of the water-saturated zone is called the “water table”. When water seeps in from the surface and reaches the water table, it begins moving toward points where it can escape, such as wells, rivers, or lakes. An aquifer is any type of geologic material, such as sand or sandstone, which can supply water wells or springs. The groundwater, which supplies wells, often comes from within a short distance (a few miles) of the well. How fast the groundwater moves depends on how much the well is pumped and the type of rock particles or bedrock through which it is moving. STREET LIGHT OUTAGES There are over 1,600 street and park lights located in Brooklyn Center. Some lights are City owned and operated and some are owned and operated by Xcel Energy. To report a street light that is out, please see the City’s Website at: www.cityofbrooklyncenter. org and search Keywords: street lighting. You can also access Xcel’s Website at: https://odl.xcelenergy.com/ODL/ OUTAGEREPORT/ Follow the link to the webpage which has a map regarding City owned versus Xcel Energy owned street light locations, or call the Public Works Department at 763-585-7100 for assistance. MOST MINNESOTANS GET DRINKING WATER FROM WELLS Wellhead protection is a way to prevent drinking water from becoming polluted by managing possible sources of contamination in the area which supplies water to the public well. Wellhead protection will be an ongoing need for communities. Everyone has an important part to play in protecting drinking water wells; today as well as for the future. HOW WELLS BECOME POLLUTED Wells become polluted when substances that are harmful to human health get into the groundwater. Water from these wells can be dangerous to drink when the level of pollution rises above health standards. Many of our everyday activities can cause pollution. Much can be done to prevent pollution, such as wise use of land and chemicals. The expense of treating polluted water or drilling new wells can also be avoided. Help avoid drinking water contamination by being an environmentally aware citizen. HOW TO PROTECT YOUR LOCAL GROUNDWATER Recognize and manage possible sources of contamination on your property or in your neighborhood. Use hazardous products as directed and be mindful of proper disposal. Conserve water whenever possible. 13 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org HELP PREVENT SANITARY SEWER BACKUPS Recently, staff members in the Utilities Division have been experiencing pump failures in the City’s sanitary sewer system due to clogging by items not meant to be disposed of either by flushing or in drains. In order to minimize the risk of a sewer backup, it is important for property owners to be careful about items they flush and put down drains. Property owners and managers must remember that just because it is possible to get an item down sinks or flushed down a toilet doesn't mean it should be put there. Please adhere to proper disposal methods. When excessive amounts of grease or other inappropriate waste are put into the sanitary sewer system, they can cause sewer lines to plug and pumps to fail. This can lead to sewers backing up into homes and businesses and possibly causing serious property damage. How Residents and Businesses Can Help Property owners can help keep sanitary sewer lines clean by only disposing of appropriate waste in the sanitary sewer system. Some items that cause backups are diapers, shop towels, fats, oils, grease, cloth rags, baby wipes, cleaning wipes, bandages, feminine products, prophylactics and stringy material such as floss or hair. Please dispose of these items in the trash so the system continues to flow properly and your basements and businesses remain dry. Also remember that even though some products such as baby wipes are labeled as “flushable” it is not appropriate to flush them. If your sanitary sewer backs up, the Brooklyn Center Utility Division may be your initial source of help. If the problem is in the main sewer line, City employees will come out to solve the problem. This service is available day or night, seven days a week (including holidays) and there is no fee for this service. The City is not responsible for problems in the house or the sewer line between the main sewer and the house. Problems in these areas are the responsibility of the property owner. Before you call the City, try to determine where the problem lies. This can be done by checking to see if the neighbor directly across the street is also having a problem. If the neighbor does not have a problem and the water backs up when you use it, the problem is likely in your system. To repair these problems, call a plumber or a sewer cleaning company. If water is coming up in the house when no water is being used, the problem is most likely in the City main sewer line. Contact the Public Works Department at (763) 585-7100 between the hours of 7 am and 3:30 pm, Monday through Friday. During other times, emergencies can be reported by calling 911. The dispatcher will contact one of the City’s Public Works employees to resolve the problem. Preventing Sewer Backups Many residential sewer problems can be avoided by having your sewer line cleaned periodically and taking care of what goes into your sewer system. Following are the most common causes of blocked sewers: X Grease and Oils – Store grease in a container and dispose of hardened grease in the trash. Use garbage disposal sparingly and flush with plenty of water. X Paper Products – (tissues, paper towels, “flushable wipes”, etc.) Put them in the trash, not the toilet. These items do not dissolve. X Lint and Hair – Screen all drains and use a lint trap on your laundry hose. X Tree Roots – Avoid planting trees or shrubs over your sewer line. Roots are the number one problem in residential sanitary sewer systems. If you hire a private sewer cleaning service to remove tree roots, please notify the City as soon as possible. A secondary backup could occur when the roots from the private service become lodged in the City sewer line resulting in either a backup into either your house or a neighbors’ house. Thank you for helping to keep our sewer lines moving in the right direction! 14 FALL 2018, Edition 205 NEWS Ci t y Upcoming Heritage Celebrations Take time to learn more about the history of ethnic populations and how they have contributed to the culture and heritage of our community. Here are upcoming Heritage Celebration dates. SEPTEMBER 15 - OCTOBER 15 HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH OCTOBER NATIONAL ITALIAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH OCTOBER 6 GERMAN-AMERICAN DAY NOVEMBER INDIGENOUS AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH SEPTEMBER 3 LABOR DAY In observance of Labor Day City Hall is closed on Monday, September 3. SHARE YOUR COMMUNITY EVENTS ONLINE Need a place to share your public event with the community? The City of Brooklyn Center’s online Community Bulletin Board might be what you are looking for. The Community Bulletin Board is offered as a free public service. For more information regarding eligibility or to see latest updates visit www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org/ BulletinBoard. SEEKING EMPLOYMENT? The City of Brooklyn Center is seeking applicants to fill several positions. Below is a list of current openings. Don't delay, there is still time to apply! • Firefighter (Paid On-Call) • Lifeguard (PT) • Neighborhood Engagement Liaison (PT) • Water Safety Instructor (WSI)/Water Safety Instructor Aide (PT) For more information visit: www.governmentjobs. com/careers/brooklyncenter. DID YOU KNOW Pending List for Future Council Work Sessions • Cities United Membership • ADA Transition Plan • Liquor/Public Dance • T-21 Tobacco Regulations • Hennepin County Library • Rental License The Council meets in Work Session at 6:00 pm the 2nd and 4th Monday of the month at 6301 Shingle Creek Pkwy, Brooklyn Center, MN 55430. For details visit www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org. City CONTACTS Council Members Mayor Tim Willson Voicemail: (763) 569-3450 mayorwillson@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us Councilmember Marquita Butler Voicemail: (763) 569-3446 councilmemberbutler@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us Councilmember April Graves Voicemail: (763) 569-3448 councilmembergraves@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us Councilmember Kris Lawrence-Anderson Voicemail: (763) 569-3444 councilmemberlawrence-anderson@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us Councilmember Dan Ryan Voicemail: (763) 569-3445 councilmemberryan@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us City Manager Curt Boganey (763) 569-3300 Printed on recycled paper City PHONE NUMBERS Administration ..............................................(763) 569-3300 Community Development ............................(763) 569-3330 Inspections, Code Enforcement, Ownership Services Public Works/Engineering ............................(763) 569-3340 Parks, Streets, Utilities ...............................(763) 569-7100 Finance .......................................................... (763) 569-3320 Utility Billing .............................................(763) 569-3390 Community Center .......................................(763) 569-3400 Activity Weather Line ...............................(763) 569-3442 Earle Brown Heritage Center .......................(763) 569-6300 Centerbrook Golf Course ..............................(763) 549-3750 Fire ................................................................(763) 549-3600 Police (General Info) .....................................(763) 569-3333 Emergency & Non-Emergency Officer Assistance ......911 City COUNCIL MEETINGS City Council Regular Session meetings are held the 2nd and 4th Mondays of the month at 7 pm. Informal Open Forum is held at 6:45 pm before Council meetings for persons who wish to address the City Council about issues not scheduled on the agenda. City Council Work Sessions are held immediately following the Regular Session City Council meetings. City Council Meetings are broadcast live on cable Channel 16. Replays shown Tuesdays at 6:30 pm and Wednesdays at 2:30 am and 10:30 am. You may also watch City Council meetings on-line, on demand at your convenience through a link on the City website. Call City Hall to verify meeting dates or visit the City’s website at www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org. 6301 Shingle Creek Parkway Brooklyn Center, MN 55430-2199 www.cityofbrooklyncenter.org e-mail: info@ci.brooklyn-center.mn.us City Hall (763) 569-3300 Job Information Line (763) 569-3307 TWO TEAMS DECLARED WINNERS AT THE 2018 DUDLEY/BUDWEISER CLASSIC Although the 2018 Dudley/Budweiser Classic softball tournament sponsored by Easton held June 28-July 1 was rained out on Sunday morning, the tournament was a success. After the skies opened up, there was one undefeated team in the men’s division (Xtreme/Miken from MN), and one undefeated team in the women’s division (Smash It/Derby Girls from Washington) declared the winners. Many thanks go out to our sponsors, Dudley Sports, Budweiser, Easton, and Mpls. Northwest. Brooklyn Center Crime Prevention, Brooklyn Center Little League, and Brooklyn Center Lions and Lioness clubs benefit from the event.